Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Who are we in Christ?


The danger that 21st century Christianity faces is that we invite Jesus into our culture rather than being immersed in His. 

We take so much for granted without being moved by the immense challenges that Jesus faced to be believed in and followed. Why would God choose an obscure country village for his son to live in for all but three of his thirty three years. According to Israeli scholars, there were only about twelve families in Nazareth when Mary had her history defining encounter with Michael, the Archangel. Twelve families in the back blocks of Galilee. Twelve families, far removed from the pride, power and prestige of Jerusalem. A little hamlet who knew both Mary and Joseph, a small community that were suddenly plunged into a crisis. As Mary's story spread through the village the choice that they faced was the ghastly decision to either stone Mary and Joseph, or, somehow, believe the unbelievable. Mary made matters much worse by running away to her cousin Elizabeth. Joseph must have been protesting his innocence,  after all his life depended on it. An angel had to silence his protestations.

Yet, this was Jesus' introduction to mankind. Surrounded by gossip, innuendo, doubt and ridicule, God shows us, through Jesus, just who he represents. Jesus owns the plight of the unfairly accused, the illegitimate pleading for equality, the rejected and the marginalised.

To be followers of Jesus, to be disciples, the be worshippers, we must start with the reality of all that Jesus was, all that he identified with, all that he welcomed. 

It may not sit comfortably with the morality of our comfortable 21st century worship, but this is his story and this is our starting point. This is who we are in Christ. 




3 Comments:

Blogger Deb said...

Your opening statement grabbed my attention and is definitely truth. We do make assumptions, based on our upbringing and cultural expectations. We sometimes sing those assumptions and we even hear them from the pulpit. It's a sobering thought for anyone who dares to teach or communicate for Christ. Am I making Christ fit my mold? Thought provoking, as you usually are, Geoff.

7:27 pm  
Blogger Deb said...

Your opening statement grabbed my attention and is definitely truth. We do make assumptions, based on our upbringing and cultural expectations. We sometimes sing those assumptions and we even hear them from the pulpit. It's a sobering thought for anyone who dares to teach or communicate for Christ. Am I making Christ fit my mold? Thought provoking, as you usually are, Geoff.

7:27 pm  
Blogger Geoff Bullock said...

Thanks Deb, appreciate you taking time to comment. Please feel free to share my blog if you wish. I will continue to post some some thoughts.

9:47 am  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home